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an effective curriculum to prepare us for life? teach us about politics? [inaudible] education and [inaudible] which can be achieved in a year? or do you want to drag out the campaign making public transport cheaper, better, and assessable for all? for at least another year? it's your decision. [applause] >> thank you very much indeed. we have two great speeches to get us to a cracking start. and i'm not looking for contributions from the floor, yes. the first person i saw was the young woman there. [inaudible conversations] >> yes. start by saying name and area. >> from north york shire. as we're awear and public transport is a big issue [inaudible] and again this is debate. i'm from north york shire we run the -- [inaudible] this summer which allows young people to travel on buses for one pound for a whole day. the scheme was a great achievement it was only one county wide and by the north -- [inaudible] council therefore we came across many barriers for a staff not all of us complete -- [inaudible] and when they did it was often on their own term. in addition it was very hard for us to pro
to make a positive contribution to society a fair access to education, employment and =tranfour and indeed discrimination is the real challenge we face. let's let them give us the opportunities they deserve. [applause] >> jack, thank you bring much indeed for the beach. i am looking for a contributor from the east midlands. whoever thought? please, welcome. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i agree with my fellow same-sex marriage is an highly important issue and is widely spoken about as at present the case it would be one of our debates today. however, i feel it is a nonpowered young people can agree. many kids in my constituency when i consorted them said yes it is the highest important topic. but when i went back to front of this county said they would want to see campaign. that shows that it was at the moment something being done about it. the mission of the government are saying in part of their manifestoes they want is to have been by 2015. i feel there is a more important issue in the debate last. they restarted their curriculum and now isn't the right time to look at same-sex marriage. t
at the department of education, the children's minister edward. edward, andrew, angela, it's a delight to have you. before we hear from andrew and angela, i call in order to read a message from the prime minister, from yorkshire. [applause] member of the parliament, i'm -- [inaudible] we are -- this is your opportunity to debate -- by more than [inaudible] 260,000 people. -- [inaudible] include -- [inaudible] the children and the people. he has -- [inaudible] to listen to your -- [inaudible] and translate your views to the hard work of government. your meeting today will be young people ato -- the opportunity to debate issues that -- [inaudible] it's a big thing. i wish you the latest -- [inaudible] i look forward to hearing your debates. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for reading that. that is a delight to have the prime minister's support. i now call to say some words to us, the leader of the house of commons. mr. andrew. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. [applause] thank you, mr. speaker. members of the you'll parking lotment, i'm debated to -- that righted to welcome you for the fourth
morning. thank you for educating people on your television show. we live in a community where we are experiencing exactly what you're talking about, particularly businesses, and i am talking big businesses. they do not like where the doors are located, or this department over here, and what they are doing is restricting jobs and tax base. i would encourage people to get involved in your institute and fight this because it is not doing anything for the economy or our country. merry christmas to everybody. host: john, thank you for the call. what is the history of the cato institute, founded in 1977? guest: it was founded to promote liberty and economic freedom, starting in san francisco, and then move into washington, d.c. milton friedman admitted the kindle institute has never sold out. we still work for liberty and freedom. i've been working with the cato institute since 1995 and full time since 2007. host: mary, fort washington, maryland. democrat. caller: i would suggest thinking that if you follow all of the problems come at the end of the trail you will find the smiling grin
of -- [unintelligible] it means i have been educated with women. when were very important for me, my grandmother, my mother. they give me and show me threw themselves an example of what women wear. women that were strong, a clever, human. and at the same time, sometimes stronger than men. so that i realized very quickly that women could be more interesting, more clever, because of maybe education or maybe because of the fact that they have not played football, to be quiet, you know, more into things to obtain. to obtain something. they have to be 10 times more clever than the men. they have everything it themselves already at the base. >> that we already know we are 10 times more intelligent. [laughter] >> yes. i mean, like, men did not realize that most of the time. even if the need. the need, you know. so that, you know, truly, i felt the power of the woman. at the time, also like the woman at sleeve and that kind of thing. we admit -- we -- women reacting on taking out the bra and putting it on fire. the fire of the bra. a symbol. showing that we are as much as the men. maybe we first tried to lo
. and was much better educated and having herself worked as a teacher for many years. there was nothing this woman could not do too late linoleum or explain mathematics. following the birth of their fourth child she would handle the affairs at the milk while skinner was in england and ran the boarding house. and was intimately involved in her husband's business but she was the wife of a rich manufacturer. there is no economic reason for her to absorber these responsibilities. she took them on. but lizzy was a partner for the first wife died young. but she had raised the children as her own and given birth to age more and of the 10 children seveners still living and all were thriving. and with smart educated young women. but studying french with nine other than george to would be the prime minister of france. going one step further and nina went to college was up in poughkeepsie new york. the oldest, will, 17 was about to close out high-school at the prestigious seminary in east hampton and massachusetts. graduation was a few weeks away if he could make it without being expelled. he is c
to be assigned, but he also wanted to exposes them to a european education into the world of international affairs in the world of diplomacy. and they went to sea with benjamin franklin and benjamin franklin's lavish chÂteau outside paris at the time and john quincy adams went to a french school with benjamin franklin's grandson. within several, he was speaking french folly. he was a gifted child. by the time he was 15 he could speak four languages fought late, had rd studied latin and greek. he was so gifted in foreign languages or when the family friend, francis daniel was appointed ambassador, minister to russia, our first minister to russia, he couldn't speak french at the time french was not the language of international diplomacy. there's always the language spoken in the russian court. francis couldn't speak french. young john quincy could and asked john could he take john quincy adams within two st. petersburg as secretary of litigation is 16 years of age. john quincy adams goes up two st. petersburg and spends the europe they are. in the wintertime, it was too cold to really vent
votes and cut those deals in part because of his lifelong political education. he began it as a young man in well yams burg, he listened to patrick henry said -- he spoke of henry, he spoke as homer wrote and loved that, partly because he couldn't do it. it's always a good sign when they recognize qualities in orrs which they don't pez. that kind of humility, however relative that term is in talking about this species called politicians is a virtue. he learned how to master the ways and means of politics because of that disastrous governorship. i think he was much faster to react to louisiana when the purchase became open and a possibility. as you'll remember, basically, napoleon is going to sell this to us, one of the great real estate deals ever. and jefferson immediately in 1803 begins to think, well, we're going to have to amend the constitution to do it because he was a strict constructionist, right? he had followed alexander hamilton over broad presidential powers. then about the third week of august, 1803 -- that was the fourth of july. about the third or week of august he gets
started out as an easiest, then became a collector and then became an educator to her website called raglan in.com and ultimately through this book. the story how i first discovered historic newspapers have been about five years ago. at least when i took her first family vacation to illinois, a cozy mississippi river town, were on the main strip every discovered they were bookshop and in that rare book shop i found this nondescript container full of old newspapers, picked one up and started reading it and it april 21st 1865 near times. i was reading abraham lincoln assess the nation every word for the capture of his conspirators. that moment triggered in me an intense passion and enthusiasm for history that i previously had never had. so for the next five years, it became this journey of meticulous collecting a newspapers because i'm tucked away in the midwest. i don't have convenient access to a lot of the wonderful archives on the east coast. i don't have access to a lot of the originals found in the libraries and institutions across the country. so i made it a point to collect the
to the education of our children and the health of the market. .. [applause] our coverage of the international summit of the book continues now by a panel called the publishing world yesterday and today. it about one hour 20 minutes. >> good afternoon, ladies and supplement. it's a pleasure see so many of you, so many old friends here. i have a great privilege of being senior consultant for the librarian of congress, and i am also a writer and editor in chief and the world. and also a veteran of the publishing world. i have worked for many years as a senior editor and also at simon & schuster as well. i have been around the block. a bit of a veteran in august. but we have learned so many things in this conference so far. such a delight in such a pleasure to have heard the wonderful keynote speech. the report from the frontline with so many countries like russia and south africa, to learn that the first encounter between europe and the new world, but between the conquistadors and into was over a book. with thomas jefferson and the wondrous discussion register. such a vibrant discussion. it is w
with literacy. that is a problem with education. there is an inevitable path of increasing sophistication, the amount of information that people can process and the amount of narrative complexity that people can process. it is on an increasing curve. >> i know you are an optimist. >> i am optimistic. look at television in 1968 versus or television is today. look at what the cbs evening newscast from 1974 versus what is happening today. it has become more politicized. the ability to process information has grown. these are issues of education. >> [inaudible] >> right. it is now more obvious. >> there is ongoing battle globally. people are putting out ideas. various ways, hidden or not, and value systems for these arguments. that is going on all the time. every single person involved on whatever level in our industry is putting something out there. obviously, you have to take responsibility for it. you try to work out exactly -- you join in a battle. someone else is saying probably the opposite. you have to get in there and do it. other people will not stop and you have to do battle with th
as her husband, lizzie was much better educated having attended both elementary and boarding schools and having herself worked as a teacher for many years. there seemed nothing this exceedingly capable woman couldn't do from layingly knoll yum to explaining mathematics. following the birth of their fourth child, she even helped handle affairs at the mill while skinner was away in england, and later she helped to run the mill's boarding house. she was intimately involved in her husband's business. but what set her apart was the fact that she was the wife of a rich manufacturer. there was no economic reason for her to be absorbing these responsibilities. she simply took them on, utilizing her amazing genius for organization and development. more than a wife to skinner, lizzie was a partner. skinner's first wife had died young, but lizzie had raised his children as her own and given birth to eight more as well. of these ten children, seven were still living, and adding to skinner's sense of accomplishment, all were thriving. nelly and nina, 23 and 20, had grown into smart, educated youn
believe we can integrate this local knowledge into future disaster prevention education by listening to the song. >> reporter: through her research, she was further shocked to find leer yaks about the march 11 earthquake have been added to the song. ♪ ♪ >> reporter: memories of the tsunami are gradually fading. >> translator: life is back to normal now. >> translator: a tsunami won't hit us again. >> reporter: at a local school, takafuji introduces the song to the children by showing them videos she took of the island. >> translator: the song says to immediately run to the nearest hilltop. >> translator: i realize that you must always be cautious and that you must immediately run away in order to save your life. >> reporter: although the song was only sung in indigenous communities, it is gradually being passed on to a wider audience as a song that can actually save lives. nhk world, indonesia. >>> thousands of people waiting to go home. tons of debris waiting for disposal. vast tracts of land waiting to be restored. overcoming the challenges of the past 2011 disaster won't be ea
? >> what i mean is that my education, i have been looking at old movies that i love. we speak about the reputation of the parisian, which was supposed to dress very well. i think that, you know, in france, the eccentricity -- for me, eccentricity is very chic and it is what i love. it is so much about the good taste, which paralyzed. it is still a city where everybody meets profession, sure, but it is sad that you did not seek only may be in the young people, but you do not see when people are in the rain, let's say, in society, like having the joy to address. like you have to be like the color of the street of paris. you ought not to be remarkable. it is very demanding of the people. so i said to the people, no, we have to be like everyone else. in london, it was completely different, and it still is. more distance that makes them, for me, more fascinating than the french. >> we want to take questions from the audience, but i did just want to ask you a quick question about your work in movies because that has been so extraordinarily exceptional. i think probably a lot of people --
remembering general norman schwarzkopf. >> and have gun, will teach. hundreds of educators get a hands-on lesson in firearms. controversial proposal. good morning. welcome to "early start." 5:00 a.m. in the east. >>> it is the last friday of 2012. i've just had that pointed out to us. one final desperate attempt to dodge the fiscal cliff, just four days left before we go over the edge triggers tax hikes, spending cuts that could send the nation back into recession. the president calling for members of the congress the back. a gang of six attending. vice president biden, harry reid, house minority leader nancy pelosi, mitch mcconnell and john boehner representing the republicans. brianna keilar is live from washington. is anybody optimistic that a deal could be done today around a table? >> i will tell you the optimism is sort of sinking. senate majority leader harry reid said he doesn't see how it can get done by january 1st. we heard from president obama before he left from his vacation that he was optimistic. logistically the white house will tell you it's possible. when you listen t
house" which lays out a radical vision of education in the future of america, and the marriage of traditional classroom and digital technology, employing them in a way that flips our traditional model of education. >> by the way, carn appeared on our afterwards program so if you want to watch that author, type in his name. long history between 12 and christopher hitchens. >> long history. we published christopher, "god is not great" in 2007. a number one "new york times" best seller. after that book we published his first memoir, followed last september by an essay collection called "arguably." also went on to be a best seller, but together under extreme circumstances. he was very ill at the time. we hoped to publish a book -- a long are -- longer book about his illness but we corrected the article for vanity fair. >> you're going to be at the miami book fair next week, november 17th, 18th, along with carol blue, and martin amos. >> that's going to be a really interesting panel to be on. martin and christopher knew each other for a very long time. carol and martin are very clos
and neither highly educate and both of them made a very good living, but as a twist, when we look at labor, we have to look at how inclusive the labor unions are, and how much they advocate for people across race and gender, and we have to look at the strategy of labor unions in terms of is it about broadening the numbers of people who are participating in unios s or it is about protecting the interest of the feem who already have union membership? that is a critical case where when you talk about expanding the role of unions, you have to also talk about expanding the ranks of unions, because that is sometimes going to cut against the grain of cheollective bargaining rank for existing members, so without overcomplicating the things, we have to be aware that the overall percentage of american workers who have been unionized is slhrinking in part because o the destabilization of the market that is not educated. >> and the role of the union is a way to go broad and deep. and lord knows that the best paying jobs have nothing to do with having a ph.d. and stay right, there because we want to stay i
jennings when i was director of education at james madison's month peelier in virginia. i was familiar with jennings' memoir considered by the white house historical association to be the first memoir of life in the white house. it was titled "a colored man's rem innocences of james madison," and as the title implies, it's really more about the so-called great man than it was about the author himself. my interest was in paul jennings. i set out to discover elements of his own biography to uncover the circumstances behind the original publication of the memoir in 1865 and to find an interview living direct descendents. a slave in the white house, paul jennings and the madisons is the story of paul jennings' unique journey from slavery to freedom. it played out in the highest circles of ideas and power. the white house, james madison's study. it's the story of paul jennings' complicated relationship with the father of the constitution, james madison. jennings was the constant servant in james madison's study, and as madison would discuss political subjects of the day, and during his reti
. gregg: what do you think? >> i think i want to go after the whole legal educational complex. as a legal employer myself i can tell you that my heart goes out to anyone graduating law school right now. mr. sullivan wants to say that they are providing you a legal education, a socratic-type experience, that's fine. put that on the brochure. have it in big letters when you get the nice gloss see brochure and say look, we are not here providing you with the skills you need to actually pay back this $250,000 in debt we'll saddle you werement we are providing you with an educational experience and let the cards fall where they may. it's absolutely an ethical problem. to realize how wrong this is look at what goes on in medical schools. you don't see thousands of medical students graduating medical school with no prospect of employment. if the medical schools can calibrate the number of admission slots to the need for doctors why can't the a ba do the exact same thing. gregg: i did teach a law school class and what they represented to their students, and truth there is no resemblance. >> the d
of education among others for failing to protect the children from, quote, foreseeable harm. >>> in orlando last night a show of solidarity with the newtown victims at the russell athletic bowl. in their game with rutgers virginia tech's players wore a large ribbon on their helmets that read, "58 prevail." it was a reference to the total number of victims from both the newtown, connecticut shootings and the virginia tech shootings. >>> an update tonight on former president george h.w. bush who has been hospitalized in houston since the day after thanksgiving. a statement from his office says mr. bush's condition has improved and so he has been moved out of intensive care and into a regular room to continue his recovery. the former president has been treated for bronchitis and had a fever this week. >>> when "nightly news" continues on this saturday, with marijuana laws relaxed, how some entrepreneurs are seeing high potential in pot. and later, though he has never played football, why this young man may have a real leg up on making the nfl. [ male announcer ] this is steve. he loves risk. b
was astonishing. he was driven primarily by this incredible will that he had and thirst for education. he was embarrassed to did not finish college, so he finished law school instead. he went on and on. the idea of senator byrd as majority leader of the senate is quite remarkable. he came into the senate with the great class of 1958. they set the foundation for what i call the great senate that came later, the progressive senate. it was a democratic landslide that year. he was undeniably the most conservative of senators elected. philip hart, a whole -- whole flood of liberal senators and then there was robert byrd. it was not his youthful membership that was the issue. in later years, he remained against civil rights, which was essential thing the senate was about in the 1960s. he opposes civil rights act in 1964 and 1965. he opposed thurgood marshall when he was nominated. senator byrd was so conservative on some of these issues that in 1971,richard nixon toyed with putting him on the supreme court just to show the senate what he could do. senator byrd moderated his views all the time.
good education. i was on the screen for 15 seconds it took about about half a day and that's not including the time i spent in costume and makeup. the effort that goes into making movies and television drama is just terrific. i was lucky around the senate and i thought it was him for weaving. this is just a prop, didn't appear in the story. but it was a 12th century limb. not a change century by century, a technology by developed and i happen to know this is not an 11th century loom or 13. it was the 12th. there might be six people know what to know that, but someone working on the film do it and got that exactly right. that kind of thing is very impressive. >> are you tempted to be in any more of these things? >> i like the clamor. it is a privilege to work with one of the stars and i felt honored and i learned about. i i learned, for example, that she can't act if you're trying to remember your lines because then you say your lines with outlook on your face, what comes. if you're going to ask in a 152nd book you have to know your lines automatically. i do know that before
such an incredible opportunity, a platform where we perform op ra, sim fonic music, educational projects will go up immediately because all the schools, universities, city of five million people. you can perform one leg nut cracker 20 time ace year, you can perform 50 times a year, each of those 50 nuts crackers a year you can devote 40 to schools it is a huge opportunity to help young people understand their part draft decision. because of course they have all these toys and also kid does it all the time but they will go for the first time at 8 or 9 years old to see the magic of theatre. most of them will come back, we know that most of them will come back. it's much easy everto start at 8, 9, 10 and then understand ballet, opera, theatre, music, rather than do it when are you 25, 30 for its first time. it's too late, maybe. >> back to politics for a moment. when you look at russia today, democracy, economic growth, human rights, press freedom. where do you think they are on those issues? >> i think for the country which has 20 years history, if you start from breakup of soviet union, things are l
a second wind and this was in the education of general david petraeus by paula broadwell. any comments on those books? >> it is funny refer to that book as a poorly amid this title about a second wind because after general david petraeus administration, that is exactly why her book got the second wind and why the paperback publication was pushed up. what it has done a little bit though is take away from the larger aspect of these books. when scandal rears its head, one focus is too much on that instead of the substance of the book. one thing worth pointing out especially in relation to the mark cohen and mark cohen was a pseudonym for one of the navy seals who was involved in the mission to kill osama bin laden, the book's publisher which is penguin press, they announced with only weeks to spare, i felt they did a very brilliant job of marketing that book. it didn't help or perhaps didn't hurt depending on who you ask that mark owens's real name was dutifully revealed by the media which than cost its own fire storm and the like but the upshot is many of these books with commensurate mi
. host: at any time take after his father whether he would study classical education, becomes? guest: when he was five or six he was writing his only little history of medieval warfare. i stayed back. we played a wonderful video g e game, age of kings. it is very -- you build your own castles and that was -- i let little play it as much as he wanted to. he took to reading and he loves histo faulkner. he is a reader. so, i just stand back because he will go wherever he goes. host: go back there. what about the 1980's. what work did you do then? guest: at a certain point after factories and bar tending my father had been an employee, the japanese with call him a company man in a small manufacturing company outside of boston and he had moved from sales manager to vice president to president without any equity. my brother and i both worked there in high school in the factory. the company made steams valves and heavy iron castings for steam traps on oil lines or submarines. it was lit manufacturing but -- light manufacturing but dirty, dusty. that is what our summer jobs consisted of. my
is at st. john's in annapolis, loving it. >> he does not take after his father -- a classical education, books? >> when he was five or six he was writing his own histories of medieval warfare. i stayed back. we played a wonderful video game, age of kings. you build your own castles and -- i let him play as much as he wanted to. he took to reading. he loves history, faulkner, he is a reader. so i just stand back. he will go wherever he goes. >> what about the 1980's -- what kind of work did you do then? >> at a certain point, after factories and bartending, my father had been an employee at a japanese company and outside of boston. he had moved up to vice president to president with no equity and a share stock. my brother and i had worked there in high school in the factory. the company made steam valves and big heavy iron casting for steam traps on oil lines or submarines. it was light manufacturing, but dirty, dusty, and that is what a summer job consisted of. my brother is older -- he came out of the army and went in as jr. purchasing clerk. sometime in the late 1970's i had had an of
scandinavian and educated at a liberal arts college in the university -- he said to me, the low-scaled american worker is the most overpaid worker in the world. [laughter] he said it's sad, but it's true. the american-based ceo of the one of the world's largest fund managers told me about a conversation that handed in his investment committee. quite often people would tell me things like they didn't say it, but their friends said snit my kids do that also sometimes. so he said this is someone else on the investigating committee said. his point was that the transformation of the world economy lifts four people in china and india out of poverty and into the middle class, and meanwhile one american drops out of the middle class, that's not such a bad trade, right? like four to one. i spoke to a cfo of a u.s. technology company, and this was like a really, a person who was really sort of charming and lovely life story. he was taiwanese-born, his parents were immigrants, and his parents told him and his brother when they immigrated that they were temporarily poor. i love that, you know, imagine that
deserve but have a right to an education. >> i will get my education if it is in home, school or any place. >> the taliban retaliated hunting her down, shooting her in the neck and back. the attack outraged even hardened pakistanis and all around the world, malala quickly became an international symbol of good against evil. today, she is recovering in england. >>> number one, president barack obam obama. >> tonight, you voted for action. not politics as usual. >> after a long and we mean long and bitter campaign, president obama won re-election 2340g 12, the president also won the supreme court's stamp of approval for his health care reform program and made history with this statement. >> i think same-sex couples should be able to get married. ♪ >> as 201 comes to a close, the president joined in grief with a community shocked by senseless violence. >> these tragedies must end. and to end them, we must change. >> brooke baldwin, cnn, atlanta. >> another ironman, another anchor man, another star trek, so many sequels to look forward to in 2013. our movie critic tells us which ones she is
more than that part of it is education. they say we need to rebrand u.s. goods in the mind of u.s. consumers as a value purchase. kelly: let's bring americans back by buying and investing in america. >> reporter: if there was a store for it i think probably more of us would do it. kelly: let's go out and create a business. jaime: means jobs. definitely. local police are calling this bon of the strangest cases ever. two young men vanish without a trace in an ideal i can new england river town. as we get reports that syria may have crossed president obama's red line by using chemical weapons within its borders we'll debate what the u.s. could do, if anything, in we are forced to respond. are we there yet? hey! did you know that honey nut cheerios has oats that can help lower cholesterol? and it tastes good? sure does! wow. it's the honey, it makes it taste so... well, would you look at the time... what's the rush? be happy. be healthy. you have a plan? first we're gonna check our bags for free, thanks to our explorer card. then, the united club. my motr was so wrong about you. nex
of the atlantic ocean. six years ago in st. george's bermuda, i embarked on a 140-foot sailing ship the education associations as sz -- i would be at sea for three weeks away from telephone internet and physical libraries yet i was in the middle of the research project on benjamin franklin the required me to read material and friend so i decided to use my time at sea to read a novel in that language. the book i chose is a small paperback edition of jules byrnes of around the world in 80 days first published in the newspaper serial in 1872. when i wasn't on watch or otherwise busy on on the ship i slowly made my way to the book. by french was good enough to my surprise but i actually enjoyed the story and as a historian i appreciated its period details especially the nature of the protagonists they englishman racing around the world. and has remarked offhandedly travel services at could take a person round the globe in a period of 80 days. prove that he challenged him and he is off. that 80 day measure was only conceivable by the late 19th century and the age of sales getting sails getting around
a refund of the $66,000 they've already paid for her education. her mother says, we're not bothering her. we're not a problem. >> i never wanted this to happen. that's the last thing i wanted. but i wasn't in control of my life anymore. i knew that they were holding me back, emotionally, mentally, and professionally. and that it got to the point where, that was basically my last option. >> reporter: psychologists say boundaries can be tricky for parents with college-age children. >> i have no idea whether she's mentally ill, nor if the parents have any kind of problems that may lead to the behavior that's been described. what do you do when the person is 21 and you're still concerned about the well-being of your child, if your child has a mental health problem? you're still responsible for that child. even though they're 21 years old or 25 years old. >> reporter: at a court intervention, mediators told the irelands they were the issue, not their daughter. when they stopped paying her tuition, aubrey was given a full scholarship from her school for her senior year. we reached out to the i
-time newtown residents. >> we lost 20 beautiful young children and six educators. it hurts to think we can't as a community come together with more he restrictive rules and regulations to prohibit the sale of these weapons. >> the management of nra is real not taking their responsibility for what they are doing. >> reporter: in the meantime the mother of 6-year-old noah pozner told nbc news how difficult his death has been on her family, especially on her youngest surviving child. >> she has lost her twin, and that's irreplaceable. you can't buy, beg, borrow, on or steal any of it. they were nine months side by side. now they won't be for the rest of their lives. >> reporter: noah's big sister, 19-year-old danielle, says she and her family are comforted by all the well wishes that poured into their homele town, evidence on the street near the school and piling up at the post office. >> i think it's great. it's some sort of -- it's some sort of comfort to know there's to many people there for us. it's sad that he'll never get it to live his life, but i'm happy that we got the six years that
. >> that is educational. >> zarf, quickly. >> it's this. >>> all right. jonathan is an 11-year-old drummer, enjoys exploring the p p percussive sounds of household appliances. check this out. okay. so he's 10 years old when he posted the video in september. he's taken drum lessons but says he's basically self-taught. he thinks the washing machine is easier to play than his own drum kit. sounds like a college marching band. he's really good. >> you want to demo? who's really good at percussion? you play the guitar. >> i've done enough in this segment to embarrass myself. i think we should do phil collins "in the air tonight" drum solo. >> while they do that, i'm going to tell you that up next we've got five ways to actually keep your new year's resolution in 2013 right after this. this family used capital one venture miles to come home for the holidays. that's double miles you can actually use... sadly, their brother's white christmas just got "blacked out." [ brother ] but it's the family party! really jingles your bells, doesn't it? my gift to you! the capital one venture card! for any flight, an
this at schools. i think local education decisions are best made at the local level. >> so even the -- people who should be the biggest supporters of this ideas to not only put armed police officers in schools, but to fund it republicans in congress, they are hands off, what does that tell you? >> lots of ways we can approach these issues and it really requires a multidisciplinary approach. what works in an environment in new york city isn't going to work in rural america, and there are 6,000 or 7,000 school districts in this country. one size doesn't fit all solutions are pretty clear. there are many things we can do, we can do now. let's not let those things that divide us, prevent us from moving forward in the things we're on agreement on now. >> let's keep talking, though, about what the nra does want to do right now, which is put armed police officers in schools. you know, there was an armed deputy assigned to columbine in and around the time of that massacre. his name was neil gardner, and he was monitoring students just offcampus when the students started shooting. he was one of the first
him into political life. >> translator: his education is finished, and his training has begun. he has to stay with you, with the workers. he has to learn with you. he has to learn about pakistan, learn how to work with you, learn your thinking. >> reporter: he's still too young to run for office but will likely be a figurehead in the general elections, expected within a few months. isha sesay, cnn, atlanta. >>> and the family of nelson mandela is speaking out. >> our grandfather is great. he's doing very well. >> after rumors that mandela was close to death, family members now setting the record straight. [ nyquil bottle ] you know i relieve coughs, sneezing, fevers... [ tylenol bottle ] me too! and nasal co [ tissue box ] he said nasal congestion. yeah...i heard him. [ female announcer ] tylenol® cold multi-symptom nighttime relieves nasal congestion. nyquil® cold and flu doesn't. welcome to chevy's year-end event. so, the 5.3-liter v8 silverado can tow up to 9,600 pounds? 315 horsepower. what's that in reindeer-power? [ laughs ] [ pencil scratches ] [ male announcer ] chevy's givi
have to do this at schools. i say local education decisions are best made at the local level. >> reporter: independent senator joe lieberman says gun control needs to be on the table along with all other possible solutions, heather. heather: steve, how are democrats reacting to the in. ra proposal? >> reporter: predictably they don't buy it and like it one bit. some are predicting laperriere's stand will help their cause. >> i think he is so extreme and so tone deaf he actually helps the cause of us passing sensible gun legislation in the congress. >> we have 130,000 elementary and secondary schools in this country. if we have two officers in each that would cost $25 billion. where is that money going to come from? >> reporter: senator dianne feinstein planning to introduce a new ban on assault weapons when congress reconvenes next month. heather: steve centanni in washington. thank you, steve. >> reporter: you bet. gregg: one town agrees on the nr with the nra. altoona, alabama, making sure one of its four officers are at the elementary school during school days. town reside
's education. that group peaked in 2000 in terms of americans, fell since then, turns in 2013, starts to grow and it will be bigger than the baby boom is over the next decade. >> the good times are coming, tobias? >> we think so. >> the baby boomers taking their money out. >> consumer finance, happy you brought that up, almost like you logged it in for me. survey financials shows people post-65 take their equities down. the good news is the baby boom average age is 55. so we've got ten years to worry about that. >> we do our work. >> tobias, good to see you. happy holidays. >> happy holidays to you. your little hockey player? >> the day before christmas, of course, still no fiscal cliff resolution. the $500 billion in spending cuts and tax increases start on january 1st unless the white house and congress reach some sort of agreement. we're joined by former pennsylvania governor ed rendell, co-chair of the campaign to fix the debt. and a cnbc contributor. governor, happy holidays. good morning to you. >> good morning, guys. >> so we're sitting here wondering what can be done in the next seven
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